Hawaiian Culture

Hawaiian culture stories published by Maui No Ka Oi Magazine.

Hawaiian names

Defining Identity

When your name includes twelve syllables and nearly as many letters as the alphabet, you often have some explaining to do.
Ian Cole, Breadfruit Institute

Breadfruit

As it turns out, one breadfruit can feed a family, and one variety a people. Packed in coconut-husk fiber and dry leaves, ‘ulu accompanied the Polynesian voyagers in their canoes bound for Hawai‘i.
Ni'ihau shell lei

The “Flowers” of Niʻihau

From tiny shells that wash ashore on this forbidden island come priceless treasures.
stone carver maui

Carved in Stone

The life of Kālaipōhaku Hoaka Delos Reyes has been shaped by the medium he shapes.
Hawaiian immersion schools

Olelo Hawaii

A revolution is happening in Island schools, as Hawaiian-immersion students find the keys to unlock their culture.
Taro in Maui

Taro for Sale and I’m Buying!

Purchase rare varieties of taro while supporting Maui Nui Botanical Gardens.
Gordean Bailey

Island Royalty

Kumu hula and lei maker, Gordean Bailey has spent a lifetime sharing the culture of aloha.

The Heartbeat of Hula

In contrast to modern hula (which is typically accompanied by Western-derived stringed instruments, such as the slack-key guitar or ‘ukulele), ancient hula is purely percussive.
Hawaiian pau riders

Pa‘u Riders

Hawaiian pa'u riders carry on an exuberant tradition, bedecking both horse and rider with flowers and fine fabrics.
Hawaiian healing

Healing Across Generations

Following the ancient practices of our ancestors has restored a missing piece—healing across generations.
Hokulani Holt

What is a Hawaiian Education?

We ask three maoli (native) educators to consider what it means to be an educated Hawaiian in the twenty-first century—and why it matters.
Waiopae Fishpond Lanai Hawaii

An Ancient Fishpond Resurfaces

Lānaʻi Waiaʻōpae fishpond once helped feed the island's people. Today it's feeding a hunger for culture.
Haleakala Crater

Into the House of the Sun

A millennium before Haleakala became a national park, Hawaiians traversed its moonscape crater. On the park’s centennial, we reprise that journey.
kalo field

Powered by Poi

Kalo, a legendary plant, has deep roots in Hawaiian culture.
kure atoll albatross

Our Kūpuna Islands

Kūpuna (ancestor) islands form the core of the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument.
hawaiian fisherman nets

The Fisherman’s Net

From ancient times, Hawaiians have used this handwoven tool to gather an ocean harvest. For one Maui fisherman, it still holds a way of life and a sense of identity.
Lomilomi spa massage in Maui Hawaii

Aligned with the Ancestors

Lomilomi has the potential to "heal a person's path backwards and forwards," says Jeana Naluai, owner of Ho'omana Spa.
Hana fishermen

Sustaining Culture in Hāna

Hāna’s families teach acclaimed chefs about living off the land—and remind themselves what it means to be Hawaiian.
taro farming

An Appetite for Culture + VIDEO

How Maui farmers are cultivating ancient wisdom to feed a population—and a hunger for culture.
kalo

The Future of Kalo

If Hawaiian kalo (taro) is in danger, is genetic modification the answer?
celebration of the arts

Celebration of the Arts

Every Easter weekend, the Ritz-Carlton, Kapalua, goes all out with its Celebration of the Arts: a celebration of all things Hawaiian.
Hawaiian canoes

Magic Happens

Magic happens when the Hawaiian Chamber of Commerce meets on the beach in Wailea.
Hawaiian cultural leaders in Maui

The Thousand-year-old Gift

Hawaiian culture evolved over millennia, then almost disappeared after Western contact. Maui's cultural advisors are committed to bringing it back.
Hawaiian kapa

Kapa: More to Learn

See all eleven kapa Pua Van Dorpe created to honor ancient Maui chiefs, and read their stories.
red sweet li hing mui on maui

Li Hing Mui: Hawaii’s Favorite Snack

Li hing mui is a favorite Hawaii snack. Lehia shares her top 10 ways to eat this salty sweet treat.
Kamaka Kukona

Mover and Shaker

Triple threat: He can dance. He can chant. And he can sing.

Kumu

Though he didn't set out to become an expert on Hawaiian culture, Keli'i Tau'a may be the most revered teacher of hula and chant you never heard of.