Hawaiian Culture

Hawaiian culture stories published by Maui No Ka Oi Magazine.

Hale Pa'i

Hale Pa’i

One hundred seventy-four years ago, Maui's first print shop published the first Hawaiian-language newspaper...and launched a small revolution.
lessons from the past

Lessons from the Past

What can the ancient Hawaiians teach us about preserving today's resources for tomorrow?
Hawaiian art

Making it Maoli

What defines art as Hawaiian? The answer may lie as deep as one’s DNA.
Hawaiian Goddess Pele

Fire Goddess

How could we dedicate an issue to all things hot about Hawai‘i and not include Pele? The volcano goddess is as renowned for her fiery passions as for the molten lava with which she creates new land.

Hawaii Ponoʻi

Get the translation of Hawai'i Pono'i.
Ni'ihau shell lei

The “Flowers” of Niʻihau

From tiny shells that wash ashore on this forbidden island come priceless treasures.

Open Mind

See what happens when ancient Hawaiian culture meets modern art techniques at Maui's annual Celebration of Hawaii exhibit at Viewpoints Gallery in Makawao.

Makahiki

Each year, as the rains came and the Makali‘i, or Pleiades, appeared in the night sky, Hawaiians of old set aside time to rest, feast and play.
red sweet li hing mui on maui

Li Hing Mui: Hawaii’s Favorite Snack

Li hing mui is a favorite Hawaii snack. Lehia shares her top 10 ways to eat this salty sweet treat.
Elizabeth Lindsey

Mapping the Human Story

When Elizabeth Lindsey was a child, Hawaiian elders foretold that she would embark on a journey to gather ancient wisdom that could guide future generations.
Hawaiian sweat lodge

A Healthy Sweat

Explore the sacred space of a Hawaiian sweat lodge.
Hawaiian Kapa

Beauty in the Bark

Among Polynesians, the Hawaiians of old excelled in the making of kapa. Their distant daughters have begun to reclaim this once-lost ancient art.
Hana fishermen

Sustaining Culture in Hāna

Hāna’s families teach acclaimed chefs about living off the land—and remind themselves what it means to be Hawaiian.
Taro in Maui

Taro for Sale and I’m Buying!

Purchase rare varieties of taro while supporting Maui Nui Botanical Gardens.
Hawaiian hale

Social Structure: Hawaiian Hale

Indigenous architecture was shaped by—and helped to shape—life in early Hawai‘i. Descendants of the Islands’ first people are building on that foundation.
Hawaiian Kapuna

Who Are Na Kupuna?

Like the rest of us, Hawaiian mature, age and die. And there the similarity ends.
lobelia grayana

Behold the Lobelia

The Lobelia Grayana is an endangered lavender flower that grows in Waikamoi Preserve on Maui. Ancient Hawaiians called this plant opelu.
Hawaiian tatoo

Marked

More than skin deep, traditional tattoos link modern Hawaiians to their ancestors.
Olowalu Maui

Olowalu’s Gift

This West Maui valley witnessed some of the island's most turbulent history. Now it's helping to redeem the past.
garden heiau maui

The Heiau in the Garden

On Maui's remote eastern shore, a long-hidden archeological treasure recalls the majesty of an ancient kingdom.
Kings Highway - Daniel Sullivan Photography

On the King’s Trail (VIDEOS)

A writer and a photographer explore the remains of the King's Trail on Maui, where dozens of archaeological sites spring up from the side of the trail.
shearwaters

Watch out for Wedgies!

Wedge-tailed shearwaters spend the majority of their lives at sea, where they feed on baitfish and squid. They return to Hawai'i each spring to nest.
Hawaiian games

Games Hawaiians Play

Children of Hawaii play traditional island games in the spirit of Makahiki. Ancient cultural competitions in connection with the festival and its meaning.
voyaging canoe maui

Birth of a Canoe

After nearly two decades in dry dock, the first oceangoing traditional voyaging canoe, Mo‘okiha o Pi‘ilani, embarked on its maiden voyage from Mala Wharf in Lahaina on July 11.
Hula o Na Keiki

Hula O Na Keiki

Two-dozen students, representing halau from Maui, O‘ahu, Hawai‘i Island and Japan, will compete at this year’s Hula O Na Keiki event.

Seeds across the Seas

A race of Polynesian seafarers in double-hulled canoes managed to carry with them food for the rest of their lives in Hawai‘i, along with their medicine, clothing, handicrafts, and the essence of their religion.
Kino Lau

Kino Lau

Hawaiian lore finds the spirit of the divine in the ordinary world.

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