Maki-su

Add a maki-su, a simple rolling mat of woven bamboo reeds, to your kitchen cache and you’ll be rockin’ the maki rolls in no time.

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Sara Smith

maki-suSushi, anyone? Add a maki-su, a simple rolling mat of woven bamboo reeds, to your kitchen cache and you’ll be rockin’ the maki rolls in no time. At a recent Sushi 101 class offered at Maui Prince Resort’s Hakone restaurant, resident sushi chefs Tom Kamijo and Ivan Bersamin masterfully worked their maki-su to create uniform hosomaki (thin rolls), regular maki (nori—seaweed—on the outside), and uramaki (rice on the outside). To keep the rice from gumming up their mat when rolling the uramaki, the chefs tightly wrap their maki-su in plastic wrap. Chef Bersamin advises spending a little more for the higher-quality maki-su. What to look for? A heftier mat with reeds that are flat on one side (rather than round) will make nice, smooth rolls. Those rolls don’t need to be round, either. These chefs use their maki-su, a little creativity, and some intentionally uneven pressure to mold square and even petal-shaped maki.

Learn more sushi basics at Hakone’s Sushi 101 and Sushi 102 classes. For upcoming dates, call 875-5888.

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